Quanah Parker – One Man, Two Worlds

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By KAROLYN GEPHART

Photo exhibit Quanah Parker – One Man, Two Worlds has opened at the Alvin Museum and will run through October 9, 2016.

The exhibit features rarely seen images of Comanche Chief Quanah Parker and his mother Cynthia Ann Parker. A personal collection of items from descendant Jo Nell Parjer are also part of the exhibit.

Recently, the exhibit has been enriched by a collection of artifacts on loan from Michelle and Greg Reynolds of Eagle Dancer Gallery, Texas retailer of Native American and native-themed art and jewelry. The gallery is located at 159 Gulf Freeway South in League City.

Items on display from the gallery include a Robert Redbird signed and numbered print, Sioux style tobacco pouch, Cherokee beaded otter medicine bag, Sioux dance stick, Pueblo maiden headpiece, Native American chief headdress, and large buffalo hide.

Also artifacts and art on loan from the personal collections of Barbara Moore and Bobbie Case.

On loan from Moore are the following items: Navaho code talker blanket, buffalo skull, with pictographs from Creek Tribe, Creek tribe clay pot, river cane flute, ceremonial pipes, and handmade drum.

Two signed black pottery pieces, books and authentic woven rug are on loan from Case.

The book, A Texas Legacy, about Quanah Parker is also on loan. The author is former Alvin High School history teacher, Ed Parker who was a descendant of Quanah and Cynthia Parker.

A special interactive children’s corner has been created. Research has been done on state education requirements and study guides for children in grades 4 and 7 are available at the museum, following the state TEKS objectives. Public school, private program and home school students and their teachers can benefit from the materials.

The photos and Native American items tell a story centered around two historical figures.

Cynthia Ann Parker and her son Quanah Parker are two important names in U.S. frontier history. Much can be learned from the dramatic story of these two courageous individuals.

The Comanches were the last Southern Plains tribe to surrender and Quanah is remembered as the last Comanche Chief. As a tribal leader, he later became a friend to President Theodore Roosevelt.

The photo exhibit tells this story of the lives of these two persons caught between two different worlds.

The Lakes Trail Program views this exhibit as the first step toward creating a traveling education exhibit and a heritage tourism program which uses the lives of these two persons to explain the complex story of a frontier era which involved great tragedies and deep human love as well as dramatic changes affecting large areas of both Texas and Oklahoma.

The Texas Lakes Trail Region is one of the 10 regional Heritage Trails programs created through the Texas Historical Commission.

The Alvin Historical Museum is located at 300 W. Sealy in Alvin, Texas. The museum is open on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from 11 am to 3 pm.

Rafael, Tomas,  Javier  and Luis Lamadrid enjoyed the children's corner with Native American artifacts at  the Alvin Museum. The items in the interactive exhibit are on loan from Eagle Dancer Gallery and various private collections. The exhibit runs through Oct. 8, 2016. The visiting children are the grandchildren of Nancy and Jon Curless,  Alvin Museum Society members and  regular supporters.

Rafael, Tomas, Javier and Luis Lamadrid enjoyed the children’s corner with Native American artifacts at the Alvin Museum. The items in the interactive exhibit are on loan from Eagle Dancer Gallery and various private collections. The exhibit runs through Oct. 8, 2016. The visiting children are the grandchildren of Nancy and Jon Curless, Alvin Museum Society members and regular supporters.

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