Pearland residents Wes Holloman and his daughter Georgia are finalists in a cooking contest that if won will give a cafeteria makeover to young Holloman's elementary campus. The two encourage everyone to vote online to make sure they win.

Pearland six year old named finalist in cooking contest

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Pearland residents Wes Holloman and his daughter Georgia are finalists in a cooking contest that if won will give a cafeteria makeover to young Holloman's elementary campus. The two encourage everyone to vote online to make sure they win.

Pearland residents Wes Holloman and his daughter Georgia are finalists in a cooking contest that if won will give a cafeteria makeover to young Holloman’s elementary campus. The two encourage everyone to vote online to make sure they win.

A first grader from Pearland hopes her culinary skills and friends will win a cafeteria makeover for her elementary campus.

Georgia Holloman, a first-grade student at Bay Area Christian School, is a contest finalist with her father to win a $30,000 school cafeteria makeover.

This fall, the young chef entered the Ben’s Beginners™ Cooking Contest, a national contest by the Uncle Ben’s® Brand, which promotes cooking healthy meals at home.

Parents, with children in grades K-8, were invited to submit a photo of themselves preparing a rice-based dish with their child. Holloman and her father were chosen as one of 25 finalist teams and now needs the community’s help to have them become one of this year’s five winners.

The five grand prize winners, partially determined by how many online votes they receive, each will win $15,000 cash, a hometown celebration and a $30,000 cafeteria makeover for their school.

“The winnings can help Bay Area Christian School by doing things like replacing outdated appliances and benefiting the students by allowing the cafeteria to offer fresh, healthy meals,” Wes Holloman said. As her dad, he was in the contest entry photograph cooking with his daughter.

It was her dad that found out about the contest originally.

“A few years ago, I was on www.unclebens.com looking for a recipe. I learned about the contest there, and we have entered every year. So, we were both very excited when we found out we made the finals this year,” he said.

This year their winning recipe to get in the finals was Black Bean and Rice Open Faced Tacos.

To select the five winners, the contest judges will consider the following judging criteria: creativity, presentation of the dish, appetite appeal, reflection of Ben’s Beginners’ goal of bringing families together to cook and votes received on the contest website during the Public Voting Phase.

“The biggest and greatest thing our community can do is VOTE! Since 20 percent of the contest is based on the number of votes received, we want everyone to log in and vote. In fact, it is SO easy to vote. All you have to do is click on the link and vote,” Holloman said.

The link is http://beginners.unclebe-ns.com/GHolloman.

Voters will give an email address but no other personal information is required.
Voting has begun and will continue through Nov. 13.

Jason Nave, the Head of School at Bay Area Christian School, reports that he has not specifically decided anything as of yet on what to do with the prize winning money if the Hollomans win but he is excited about the possibility, according to Holloman.
The young finalist and her dad are doing what they can to spread the word to vote.

“Georgia and I are using Social Media outlets (Facebook and Instagram), and the school has been sending out reminders through their newsletters. We have also been emailing everyone to remind them to vote every day,” Holloman said. “It has been so fun seeing the school and many friends rally around Georgia and the huge possibility of helping our school with such a great prize. We would love for others to be a part of Team Georgia and see this possibility become a reality.”

For Georgia Holloman, this opportunity has been life-changing.

“Even though I am only six years old, I can make a difference in my school,” she said. “Kids can do a lot to help others.”

Story by Karolyn Gephart