The Marguerite Rogers House Museum will host two events on June 20 and June 25.

History comes alive in Alvin

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The Marguerite Rogers House Museum will host two events on June 20 and June 25.

The Marguerite Rogers House Museum will host two events on June 20 and June 25.

By LYNN SHIGEKAWA

The celebration of the 10th anniversary of the Alvin Historical Museum will be spread across two locations and two weeks in June as the museum offers presentations and an old fashioned ice cream social to mark the historical occasion. All three events are intertwined in the history of Alvin.

On Tuesday, June 13 the museum will offer a slide show and talk “Encore Historical Presentation of The Hurricane of 1900” presented at the museum at 300 W. Sealy. Two shows at 3 p.m. and again at 6 p.m.

On Tuesday, June 20 the Alvin Museum offers a presentation titled “The History and Restoration of the Marguerite Rogers House Museum” presented at the museum at 300 W. Sealy. Two shows at 3 p.m. and again at 6 p.m.

The event capping the 10th Anniversary of the Alvin Historical Museum will be held Sunday, June 25 on the grounds of the Marguerite Rogers House Museum from 5 to 7 p.m. and located at 113 East Dumble in Alvin. An ice cream social will be followed by a special presentation from the museum society to Glenn Starkey, city councilman and editor of newly- published book “Through the Storms: the Diary of John Slover.”

To understand how these three events tie together, the Alvin Museum offers a brief recap of history:

“John G. Slover moved to Velasco, Brazoria County, Texas in 1884. When the 1900 gulf hurricane swept across Galveston Island and the Gulf Coast, his home was destroyed. Slover salvaged some of the building materials and moved to Alvin, to what is known as 113 East Dumble Street.
Most of the materials used to build the house were from the Oscar Cummings house, which was destroyed during the 1900 hurricane and was located at the corner of Beauregard and Adoue streets in Alvin. The Dumble Street location was chosen by Slover, as there were plans at that time to build a college just south of this location. Slover bought 37/100 acres out of Abstract 449 from D. Lee Slataper on November 28, 1900, and started building.
The house is Victorian Queen Anne architecture. First, he built the main part of the house, consisting of three rooms, and in following years added side rooms with cupolas and fancy trim. The last room added was a sunroom completed prior to 1909. The home has seven rooms and a bath, ten and one-half foot ceilings, and two three paneled sliding doors.
The siding on the house is cypress. Slover had a workshop where he did his carpenter work with hand tools. After completing the home, he added a handmade, white ‘bow knot’ fence. Slover spoke of his home as his ‘Chinese Castle.’
The Slover home was a showplace. The yard had satsuma orange trees, kumquats, fig and other fruit trees to show what could be grown in Alvin. Mr. and Mrs. Slover lived in the home until his death July 15, 1923. His wife continued to live there and later married Moses J. Bass. When Mr. Bass owned the home, he planted pink crepe myrtle trees along the property line and along the driveway which is now Dumble Street. Then he appropriately named the place ‘The Myrtles.’
In June 1938, James A. and Marguerite A. Rogers bought the property from Mr. Bass. During the following several years, the place was reroofed, all public utilities put in and repapered and painted. The Rogers’ daughter, Emaline Rogers Longnecker, bequeathed the property to the Alvin Museum Society in 1995. The Society restored the home and named it Marguerite Rogers House Museum, in honor of Emaline’s mother.”

For more information about events, call the Alvin Historical Museum at 281-331-4469 or email [email protected] or visit alvinmuseum.org.

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